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Archive for the ‘Folger Library’ Category

By Folger Education

 

Happy 451st, Will! Today is when people all over the world traditionally celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday, and we’re thrilled to bring you even more ideas for marking this occasion. Thanks to all the teachers, students, librarians, and theater practitioners who shared their fabulous birthday plans.

 

Here’s how the Folger celebrated on Sunday:

The Queen reads to children at Shakespeare's birthday. (Chester Simpson)

The Queen reads to children at Shakespeare’s birthday. (Chester Simpson)

–           DC Public Library debuted Uni, its first “pop-up reading room,” which brought dozens of volumes of Shakespeare and Shakespeareana to readers of all ages. Families, students, teachers, and other visitors to our open house gathered on quilts and benches in the Elizabethan Garden to read all kinds of stories, scenes, and poems. Queen Elizabeth I (or a rather convincing 21st-century doppelganger) even showed up to tell a tale!

–          “Spontaneous Shakespeare”—an open-mic event for anyone interested in speaking Shakespeare on the Folger stage—drew dozens of enthusiastic participants, who read sonnets and unforgettable lines from Titus Andronicus, The Tempest, and many more plays.

–          Local students recited their original, award-winning sonnets in Folger Theatre, and Folger Library’s High School Fellows 2014 celebrated a reunion—and then pitched in to help with the big day.

–          Experts gave talks on conservation, scholarship, rare books, and the current exhibition.

–          Swordfighting, book-making, quill-writing, scavenger hunting, music-playing, juggling, portrait-drawing, and cake-cutting were just a few more of the ways we celebrated with hundreds of Shakespeare’s closest friends. We hope you’ll join us in DC next year, especially if it will be your first time!

 

And here’s how some of you are celebrating today:

–          “At Trinity College, we are doing a rehearsed student reading of King John! We are not only celebrating Shakespeare’s birthday, but also the Watkinson Library’s acquisition if a Second Folio! (We chose King John because it is also the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta too)! Triple play!” – Christin, Connecticut

–          “For Shakespeare’s birthday, my ninth grade students will be writing their own poems using a line from Shakespeare.  The activity is called ‘The Jewel in the Crown’: the jewel is the line and they must put it in their poem, the crown.  I’ve done this activity with my students for years, but it does not always fall near his birthday. We’re finishing Romeo and Juliet projects this week, so it’s even more fitting this year. I give each student a jewel—both their line and an actual jewel image, then explain the assignment.  I then give each one a crown, usually donated by Burger King, and have them begin writing.  We’ll end with readings, mask-wearing and a few snacks to round it out.” – Jennifer, Ohio

 

Thanks again, colleagues. Let’s party!

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By Folger Education

Thanks to everyone who celebrated Shakespeare’s birthday with us on Sunday. Check back here on Thursday for a full report—and more birthday ideas from our teaching colleagues!

 

In the meantime, enjoy these photos from Sunday’s celebration.

 

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By Folger Education

 

Shakespeare’s birthday is around the corner (April 23rd), and we’ve been collecting your ideas for celebrating his 451st. To kick off this year’s festivities, we’re thrilled to share these 3 fabulous ideas from our teaching colleagues:

  1. Host a Shakespeare’s Birthday Read-a-Thon. Take a cue from Jim Cody at Brookdale Community College in New Jersey and invite your school community to participate in a public reading of Shakespeare. We wish we could join Jim and his colleagues for this year’s villain-themed event!
  2. Have an all-out birthday fair in your school library or media center. This idea comes from Janemarie Cloutier, a school librarian in Pennsylvania, who took some Folger ideas and really ran with them. Janemarie says she “had the privilege of attending a Folger workshop in Philadelphia and was inspired to organize a celebration last year… and now this year. Many of the activities at our birthday celebration were modeled on Folger lessons.” Janemarie has even added new activities this year. From collaborative sonneteering and portrait painting to Shakespearean selfies and an insult arena, this library’s birthday bash really has it all. Check out these images from last year’s celebration.
    Celebrating Shakespeare's Birthday (Janemarie Cloutier)

    Celebrating Shakespeare’s Birthday (Janemarie Cloutier)

     

  3. Play with costumes and performance. Melinda, who teaches in Colorado, sponsors a whimsical “Shakespeare Look Alike Contest” and enjoys seeing all those Elizabethan ruffs around school. We’ve also heard from teachers and students who dress as their favorite Shakespearean characters and even perform speeches by those characters throughout the day.
  4. BONUS: If you’re in DC this weekend, come to the Folger Shakespeare Library for our annual open house for Shakespeare’s birthday! Starting at noon on Sunday, April 19th, we’ll be pulling out all the stops and celebrating in a big way. Tour the Reading Rooms, see some swordfighting, perform some spontaneous Shakespeare, take a scavenger hunt, read stories with DC Public Library, and, of course, eat cake!

 

It’s not too late to share your birthday plans with us! Please send your ideas for celebrating Shakespeare’s big day—along with any images—to Corinne (cviglietta@folger.edu). We’ll be posting some more of these festive contributions next week. Thanks, and enjoy!

 

Corinne Viglietta is Assistant Director of Education at the Folger. She has taught English in DC, Maryland, and France.

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By Corinne Viglietta

 

Happy National Poetry Month! To celebrate, we share with you a special poem inspired by the poet Claudia Emerson’s visit to our very own Folger Shakespeare Library. It’s a beautiful meditation on the life of an author—not Shakespeare, but Emily Dickinson, whose belongings were on view as part of a special 2012 exhibit.

We thank Martha Harris, a wonderful teacher and friend of the Folger, who happened upon this poem and shared it with us. We hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

 

Folger Shakespeare Library

Lock of hair belonging to Emily Dickinson. Enclosed in a letter to Emily Fowler. Courtesy of Emily Dickinson Museum and Amherst College Special Collections.

Lock

CLAUDIA EMERSON

 

After the Emily Dickinson traveling exhibit at the Folger Shakespeare
Library, Washington, D.C., 12 April 2012

I noticed the quick wore off those things …
—EMILY DICKINSON, ON DAGUERREOTYPES

The evening includes a reception, wine
and hors d’oeuvres with the curator, lighthearted
discussion of the various diagnoses,
hypotheses long debated—depression,
lesbianism, grief, agoraphobia,
the kind of anxiety a cat has
about the threshold, and the most recent
theory—epilepsy; that would explain it
all, they say, spasmodic punctuation,
reclusiveness, the shame, everything,
the hour of lead, at last, unlocked.

 

You can read the rest of Claudia Emerson’s poem at Poetry Daily.

 

 

Corinne Viglietta is Assistant Director of Education at the Folger. She has taught English in DC, Maryland, and France.

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By Folger Education

 

What does sound editing software have to do with Shakespeare? Let’s find out in the third installment of our teacher-created videos on teaching Romeo and Juliet.


Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum Matt Seymour shares a creative, accessible, and engaging approach to teaching iambic pentameter. See how Matt gets his students tinkering with a technology called Audacity—and with a metrical pattern that’s close to our hearts!


Over to Matt: 

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

Iambic pentameter never made sense to me in high school. I could tell you what it was, but I couldn’t recognize or hear it. This lesson is an effort to render the patterns of stress in speech visible, so students can make a connection to sound through sight.

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

This lesson was a good start for getting students to use an online audio program, and it helped communicate what can be a difficult concept for students to grasp. Students enjoyed this lesson because they got to play with a new program and they were able to hear themselves reading. This audio program can be great for teaching students to read more fluently and having them create podcasts. Students can also use this program for group projects where they add subtext and “act out” a scene with their voices and add sound effects.

Read Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Two

Matt Seymour teaches English composition and literature at Colorado Early Colleges Fort Collins. He holds a Bachelor’s in philosophy and a Master’s in English. He has been teaching for 8 years.

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By Folger Education

 

Here’s another great teaching video on Act 1 of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, this time from Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher Alli Gubanich.

 

Here’s Alli’s message for you as you watch her iMovie tutorial on using technology and movement to teach language and imagery:

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

 

This video provides a brief overview of a favorite classroom activity (tableaux vivants) and a favorite classroom tool (iMovie).  I use iMovie in many lessons and find it intuitive and user friendly.  If your students don’t have access to Apple products, Microsoft video production software would work, as would YouTube’s own video maker.  Tableaux vivants compel students to think deeply about the essence of a text, look for powerful imagery, and create meaningful “pictures” to demonstrate their understanding and take-away.

 

THE VIDEO: Tableaux Vivants with iMovie

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

 

Students have a lot of fun with this activity.  Sometimes I’ve found it helpful to run two separate tableaux vivant activities: first students create plot-driven tableaux, then they create “deep text” or theme-driven tableaux.  Differentiating the two is important, as students will often fall back on the former, missing out on the higher level thinking required of the latter.  I always start with a word study of the term “tableaux vivants” and do some quick practice with simple sentences.  I’ve also assigned single frame artwork as an extension to this activity, which has worked nicely.  Debriefing in discussion and/or in writing also enriches the lesson.

Feel free to let me know how this activity goes for you! I’m on Twitter: @alligub.

Read Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part One

Alli Gubanich is an upper school English teacher at AIM Academy, a research-to-practice lab school in Conshohocken, PA that serves students with learning differences.  Her professional interests include technology infusion in the classroom and differentiated learning in the 21st century classroom.  Additionally, Alli is an accredited teacher trainer in the Socratic Seminar instructional method.

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By Folger Education

In July 2014, 25 teachers from all over the country gathered at the Folger for an intensive month-long study of Shakespeare sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities: the Teaching Shakespeare Institute. Working through the lenses of scholarship, performance, and pedagogy, participants completed three major projects: 1) a research paper using items in the Folger collection, 2) a collaborative performance presentation, and 3) two short video tutorials on technology-rich strategies for teaching Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth Night. This last one is directed especially at you, our teaching colleagues.

In the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing participants’ videos with you. These clips demonstrate how to use a particular tech tool to teach a specific literacy skill or aspect of a text. First up: Romeo and Juliet. (If you teach Twelfth Night, stay tuned—those videos will be next!)

Today we’re diving into Act 1 of Romeo and Juliet, and we’re lucky to have English teacher Stefanie Jochman as our guide. She’s going to walk you through what to watch for in her videos—and how she’s adapted the strategy this year in class.

BEFORE YOU WATCH

This video lesson explains how teachers can use Mozilla Popcorn Maker, a web-based video-editing program, to explore Act I, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, specifically the “Holy Palmer” sonnet. My Popcorn Maker video seeks to solve a problem teachers sometimes encounter when conducting multimedia studies: lag-time between loading video clips or showing images. Using Popcorn Maker, I knit film clips, ballet excerpts, and digital images from the Folger Library’s Luna database into one fluid video that also displays focus questions for each medium. Compilations like the one I create in this demonstration help students to analyze the representation of a key scene in a variety of artistic media (Common Core Reading Literature Standard 7) or analyze how artists like Sondheim or Zeffirelli draw on source material from Shakespeare (Common Core Reading Literature Standard 9).

THE VIDEO: Popcorn Maker Tutorial

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MqkIzLQ3Yg&feature=youtu.be

THE BONUS VIDEO: The Finished Product, a Popcorn Version of the “Holy Palmer” Sonnet

https://msjochman.makes.org/popcorn/261o

AFTER YOU WATCH

The Romeo and Juliet multimedia study remains one of my favorite lessons in my Romeo and Juliet unit because students’ responses to the discussion questions are so impressive. Some of my students have never watched ballet before this lesson, but their knowledge of Romeo and Juliet the play, one seemingly-difficult medium, helps them to make sense of another. During this lesson, students recognize and hone the analytical skills they already employ whenever they go to the movies, watch TV, or glance at a piece of art on the street, in their houses, or in a gallery. When asking freshmen to compare representations of Act 1, Scene 5, I try to focus on the scene’s essential elements: the language of the “Holy Palmer” sonnet, Romeo’s feeling of “love-at-first-sight,” Juliet’s youth, and the tension between the Montagues and Capulets (personified by Tybalt). I think students surprise themselves with how quickly they notice details in costuming and performance that communicate those elements.

My Romeo and Juliet multimedia study inspired a similar exploration with my IB junior class of Shylock’s “To bait fish withal” speech from The Merchant of Venice. I challenged those older, advanced students to determine the scene’s “essential elements,” and I let their observations (rather than my own pop-up questions) guide discussions of the clips. Actors’ interpretations of Shylock’s speech vary so wildly that the end result of our study was a greater appreciation for the nuance of Shakespeare’s language. I also shared Popcorn Maker and other video tools with some of my senior IB students, and they used the program to demonstrate how the Byronic hero survives in superhero movies.

In the future, I hope to develop a compilation and analysis assignment that requires students to independently assemble and analyze multiple representations of a scene, poem, chapter, or character.

Feel free to send me your questions or ideas on Twitter (@MsJochman).

Stefanie Jochman teaches 9th grade and International Baccalaureate English classes at Notre Dame de la Baie Academy in Green Bay, WI. She received her BA in English and Secondary Education from St. Norbert College and her MA in English from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Stefanie is a proud alumna of the 2014 Teaching Shakespeare Institute. 

 

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