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Posts Tagged ‘Teacher to Teacher’

Flipped classrooms are getting a lot of buzz right now. Can the model be used to successfully teach Shakespeare?

In a flipped classroom, instruction is offered during homework time (often in the form of short videos online), and teachers focus more on implementation activities while students are in the classroom.

Advocates say that students engage more with the material, have more opportunities to ask their teachers questions, and take more ownership over their learning with this model. If a student doesn’t understand an instructional video the first time, he or she is able to watch it again. But some critics say that this model creates problems for students who don’t have access to technology outside of school.

The New York Times Opinionator blog recently looked at the effects of the flipped classroom on Clintondale High School near Detroit, the first American high school to do a complete flip.

And in a segment about flipped classrooms that aired last week, PBS NewsHour interviewed Justin Reich, an educational researcher at Harvard University.

“What is exciting to me about the flipped classroom is that it gets teachers asking two really important fundamental questions,” Reich said. “What are the best ways for me to use my time, especially the very precious time I have in classrooms with my students, and then, what are the kinds of direct instruction that I could provide that could be digitized so people could watch it again?”

So, how about teaching Shakespeare’s plays in a flipped classroom? High school teacher Greta Brasgalla shares her ideas and methods in this video from the Folger’s “Teacher to Teacher” series:

In what ways are you experimenting with “flipped classroom” techniques? Do you think it’s a positive trend? Why or why not? Tell us in the comments below.

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Inspired, today, by David Tennant‘s affirmation in the power of performing Shakespeare, today we’re rounding up some of our favorite Teacher to Teacher videos about performance in the classroom. Getting students on their feet is one of the most important things we stress about working with Shakespeare’s language – they are, after all, plays!

Teacher to Teacher Title Screen - Performing

What can be nerve-wracking for everyone, though, is the thought of being”onstage.” In your classroom, though, it’s certainly not about putting up a full performance – perhaps not even a whole scene – it’s about saying the words out loud and discovering the action that supports the language and makes it more dynamic.

Some students like getting up to read in front of the class – but a lot may hang back. Get your audience involved as reactors and directors, as explained in these videos by Tory Virchow and Erica Smith:

Finally – see performance-based teaching in action with Sue Biondo-Hench and her students from Carlisle, PA. From group activities to personal reflection, her students find ways to bring Shakespeare’s language to life!

How do you incorporate action in your classroom?

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Teacher to Teacher Title Screen - Getting Started

For the next few weeks, we’ll be running a feature on one of our favorite online resources: our Teacher to Teacher videos! In these short clips, teachers share their favorite Shakespeare plays, ideas for teaching, and resources for the modern classroom. This week, let’s start generally with ideas for introducing your students to Shakespeare.

First things first: we know that the language can be a big hurdle for many students on Day 1. In this video, Joe Scotese describes how getting students on their feet to find the action in the words builds their confidence for the days to come. You can teach Joe’s own Tempest in the Lunchroom to try it out!

But where to begin? Leslie Kelly tells us that we don’t have to start with the opening lines of the play – instead, why not start with the characters’ deaths? Having fun with an overly-dramatic death scene will give them more ownership over performing the language, and give them a sense of play. Teach Leslie’s ESL/ELL-friendly Famous Death Lines.

Finally, are you stuck teaching only one play? Scott O’Neil gives his arguments for incorporating speeches from all over the canon into any unit. Not only will learning the speeches familiarize students with the language, they might never be exposed to certain plays, otherwise! Scott’s already compiled his favorite speeches from King Lear for his class. What speeches would you use?

 

What’s your favorite way to introduce Shakespeare? Tell us about your Day 1 experiences in the classroom in the comments below!

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