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Posts Tagged ‘Podcasts’

By Corinne Viglietta

It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across all of Shakespeare’s works? Would you like to see a picture of Titus Andronicus pie?

Check out these free, fun-to-explore web tools that bring you and your students into the world of the Folger—and Shakespeare’s words.

  1. Pinterest –Folger has over 45 boards: 1 for each play, plus others on the sonnets, Shakespeare and love, and images of Shakespeare.
  2. Podcasts – Listen to free poetry readings, interviews, and powerhouse lectures on data-mining Shakespeare and Shakespeare in American life. Use clips in your classroom, and don’t forget to click on “More Folger Podcasts”!
  3. Folger Digital Texts – The Folger editions you know and love are now online, for free (minus the glosses you’re used to seeing on the left-hand pages of your paperbacks). They’re made for you and your students to read, search, cut, paste, and manipulate for classroom activities like editing exercises, performances, and research tasks.
  4. Luna Digital Image Collection – Students can create their own “media groups” for particular plays, poems, or essential questions. Or try writing a document-based question that focuses on one item from the Folger, home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare and to major collections of books, manuscripts, and works of art!

    Luna image

    Screenshot of a Luna user’s media group on Twelfth Night

Once you’ve tried out these resources, let us know how you and your students are using them!

 

Corinne Viglietta is Assistant Director of Education at the Folger. She has taught English in DC, Maryland, and France.

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By Dana Huff

Act IV, Scene 1 of Macbeth is great fun: the three witches are brewing a “hell-broth” which they will use to conjure the apparitions that talk to Macbeth.

The scene contains some of the most memorable lines of the play and lends itself well to choral reading activities. When I teach this scene, my students create a radio play using podcasting software.

Shakespeare Set Free – Volume 1: Teaching A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth shares a fun lesson plan for teaching this scene, assigning speaking parts and sound effects to students. Podcasting software adds dimensions to this lesson that were not possible when Shakespeare Set Free was originally published.

Chris Shamburg presented a method for using podcasting software and Foley art to create sound effects as part of the Folger’s series of presentations at an NCTE conference in San Antonio in 2008.

Chris brought volunteers up to play the roles of readers and Foley artists. One volunteer broke potato chips in a bowl to mimic the sound of crunching leaves as the witches approached the cauldron, while another volunteer splashed water when the ingredients hit the cauldron.

Two popular options for recording podcasts are Audacity and GarageBand. With software such as Audacity, which is free and can be used on both Windows and Mac machines, students will first need to brainstorm ways to make sound effects. Some ideas include wind blowing, owls hooting, dogs barking, and liquid sloshing as the cauldron stirs.

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