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Posts Tagged ‘Luna’

By Deborah Gascon

When I introduced myself as one of the master teachers (the other was the fabulous Michael LoMonico) to the 29 teachers participating in the Folger’s first Summer Academy, I told them the Folger was a magical place.  I thought about the unicorn painted on a screen on the ceiling of the Folger theater and the quote around it from As You Like It:  “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.”  A magical and mysterious image surrounded by magical, mysterious words.

 

This indescribable magic was a feeling I felt during my first experience at the Folger in 2012 that I just couldn’t express or convey through words (mine or Shakespeare’s) during the academy introductions.  But a week later, after five very long and very full 12-hour days, every participant came to understand that magic and mystery that my words couldn’t describe, and I was privileged, once again, to see how Folger Education can transform a teacher’s life, his/her students’ lives and classroom practice.

 

I knew that to help everyone understand that magic and the mystery in our short week of the Summer Academy, some work would be involved.  And boy, did we work.

Hamlet's speech from Quarto One. (Image: Deborah Gascon)

Hamlet’s speech from Quarto One. (Image: Deborah Gascon)

 

We read.  We read Hamlet (using the 3-D Shakespeare strategy described here). Then we read Hamlet again and compared the Quarto One “To Be or Not to Be” soliloquy which doesn’t include “that is the question” but rather “I there’s the point.”  Yep.  It was changed!  Then we read the 1604 version of Hamlet.  Then we read the 1623 First Folio version of Hamlet.  I think you get the point about how much we read.  But with every reading came deeper understanding and a closer connection with Shakespeare’s words.

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By Corinne Viglietta

It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across all of Shakespeare’s works? Would you like to see a picture of Titus Andronicus pie?

Check out these free, fun-to-explore web tools that bring you and your students into the world of the Folger—and Shakespeare’s words.

  1. Pinterest –Folger has over 45 boards: 1 for each play, plus others on the sonnets, Shakespeare and love, and images of Shakespeare.
  2. Podcasts – Listen to free poetry readings, interviews, and powerhouse lectures on data-mining Shakespeare and Shakespeare in American life. Use clips in your classroom, and don’t forget to click on “More Folger Podcasts”!
  3. Folger Digital Texts – The Folger editions you know and love are now online, for free (minus the glosses you’re used to seeing on the left-hand pages of your paperbacks). They’re made for you and your students to read, search, cut, paste, and manipulate for classroom activities like editing exercises, performances, and research tasks.
  4. Luna Digital Image Collection – Students can create their own “media groups” for particular plays, poems, or essential questions. Or try writing a document-based question that focuses on one item from the Folger, home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare and to major collections of books, manuscripts, and works of art!

    Luna image

    Screenshot of a Luna user’s media group on Twelfth Night

Once you’ve tried out these resources, let us know how you and your students are using them!

 

Corinne Viglietta is Assistant Director of Education at the Folger. She has taught English in DC, Maryland, and France.

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By Corinne Viglietta

HSFP students

Our competitive antedaters use new web tools to find the true origins of words attributed to Shakespeare.

We just wrapped up our (exhilarating!) 2014 High School Fellowship, dubbed affectionately by its 16 participants as “Varsity Shakespeare.”

Since September, local high schoolers gathered here every Monday to take on big questions and deep learning around Shakespeare and the humanities.

They saw productions of King Lear and Julius Caesar and performed their own cutting of Twelfth Night. And they conducted original research in the Folger collection. It was a blast, and they were fabulous!

As first-time head teacher of the Fellowship (I was teaching 8th and 9th grade English here in DC until recently), I wanted to pause and share what I learned—and how it might connect to any classroom. (more…)

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Karen Peakes (Emilia) and Janie Brookshire (Desdemona) in Othello, directed by Robert Richmond, Folger Theatre, 2011. Photo by Carol Pratt.

Karen Peakes (Emilia) and Janie Brookshire (Desdemona) in Othello, directed by Robert Richmond, Folger Theatre, 2011. Photo by Carol Pratt.

By Deborah Gascon

I set a goal this school year to include several, less time-consuming (but equally as meaningful), mini-research projects into my teaching of literature. Enter resident experts!

This quick strategy to get students researching more frequently scaffolds the skills they need to complete the big, scary research paper we assign in the spring.

The research also provided another opportunity to delve deeply into the text and study Shakespeare’s language. I started using resident experts with Othello, but this project is universal to anything you teach.

I provided my students with a list of possible research topics regarding Othello and Shakespeare and the time period.

Topics included, but were not limited to, Moors, Cyprus, Venice, maps, naval officers, interracial marriage laws of the time period, rights of women, love tokens, willow trees/the willow song, sumptuary laws–the list goes on.

Some students added topics while we read: one student researched the psychology behind jealousy (after reading Iago ironically boast “O, beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-ey’d monster”) and another student asked to research the symbolism behind strawberries. The topics were vast and self-selected.

After students chose a topic, they were given time to research during our reading of Othello.  I told my students to find the five most interesting points about that topic related to the reading and then to back up those research topics with evidence from the text, combining Shakespeare’s language with their research. (more…)

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