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Posts Tagged ‘Interdisciplinary Teaching’

By Danielle Drakes

 

“High School teachers, you are the keepers of the flame.” – Dr. Peggy O’Brien, Director of Education

Two Brains Running

 

 

Earlier this month, the Folger Shakespeare Library collaborated with WQED’s August Wilson Project on a event sponsored by PNC Bank focused on teaching August Wilson and William Shakespeare right alongside.

 

The day included:

Building the Instructor’s Library: Key References for Teaching August Wilson. Presentation by Dr. Sandra G. Shannon, Founder of the August Wilson Society and Professor, Department of English, Howard University.

 

Wilson and Shakespeare in Your Classroom. Presentation and Resource Packet by Teaching Shakespeare Institute alums Mark Miazga (2008) and Amber Phelps (2012), Teachers of English, Baltimore City College High School, Baltimore, MD.

 

Reflections and Perspectives on Wilson. Q & A with Riley Temple, Lawyer, Activist, and Co-Founder of True Colors Theatre Company.

 

Two Bards Ranting. An active language workshop using text from Wilson’s King Hedley II and Shakespeare’s Hamlet led by Caleen Sinnette Jennings, Playwright and Professor of Theatre, American University.

 

Documentary screening: August Wilson: The Ground on Which I Stand. Introduced by Deesha Philyaw, Manager, The August Wilson Education Project.

 

August Wilson quote

 

Are you teaching Wilson and Shakespeare, let us know!

 

Want to know more?  Check out Teaching Shakespeare Institute alum Mark Miazga’s wrap up, Epiphany in Baltimore.

 

Stay tuned for digital versions of our resources from this amazing day of professional learning!

 

Danielle Drakes is a theater practitioner in Washington, DC and manager of school programs at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

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Until earlier this fall, I was clearly the one in love with words, literature, classrooms, teachers’ lounges, theatre.  Math and science not so much.  OK, so my grade in Biology as a college freshman was D.  Not so interested in photosynthesis. Still not the least bit interested in photosynthesis, but now I am crazily interested in archaeology and genetics.  I still am in love with words, literature, theatre, and classrooms.

But my world has gotten a lot wider and more wonderful.  And I have been brought to this place by the divinely cramped up and misshapen corpse of that devilish king, Richard III.

In August 2012, the University of Leicester (in central England) began one of the most ambitious archaeological projects ever attempted:  a search for the lost grave of Richard III, the last English king to die in battle.

Image Credit: University of Leicester

Image Credit: University of Leicester

Here at the Folger, we have just had the great honor and huge pleasure of hosting Dr. Turi King and Dr. Mathew Morris, the geneticist and archaeologist who respectively made the DNA match and led the dig.

Their story is thrilling—intense, historical, modern, gut hunches, scientific data. It’s also a story about smart people doing smart, smart work against the odds. Turi says that at the beginning, it was a little like a missing person’s story: King Richard is missing and we’re putting together all that is known now, so we can go off to find him. She also says that, at the outset, they felt their chances of finding him were past slim. (more…)

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