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by Gene Campbell

 

Before You Watch

 

The idea behind this video is a simple one: get your students to immediately get the play on its feet. Here you’ll learn how to help your students take a scene from any of Shakespeare’s plays (though in this case it’s a portion of Act 5, Scene 1 from Twelfth Night) and turn it into a montage of one-second movies using iMovie. Through this process, students will be asked to break down the dramatic structure of the scene, to do a close reading of the scene, and then to distill that scene to its barest essence.

 

The Video

 

 

 

After You Watch

 

While I did not teach Twelfth Night this year, I used a simplified version of this lesson for our first day’s discussion of Henry IV, Part I. Due to a time crunch that I’m sure everyone reading this blog has felt at one point or another, I didn’t think that I could afford the extra day or two that filming and editing a one-second movie montage could have entailed, so I opted for tableaux vivants instead. The principle was the same — get the students to do a close reading of the text and then translate the poetry, rhetoric, and imagery into one representative moment — though the time required was reduced to a single day and the finished product was a still image rather than a very brief film clip. I split my students into two groups and asked them to come up with an image for each line of King Henry’s opening speech. One student read the part, the rest of the group acted, and I photographed each tableau and then projected the photos as the reading was repeated at the end of the class so that everyone could see the finished product. Henry’s manipulation of his audience came alive as an image of unity was followed by one of discord in a neatly repeating cycle that highlighted his political savvy and duplicitous message as well as set up the questions that I would be asking them to consider when Hal begins to behave in eerily similar ways later in the play.

 

There were audible gasps from the students when I projected their work for them at the end of the day, and that energy and engagement helped carry us through our discussions in the following weeks. There was something about seeing the imagery made concrete that connected with them and allowed them to understand that speech — one that I have taught to at least two sections every year for the past fifteen years — in a way that was never possible before. I believe both the tableaux vivants and the one-second movies provide access to this level of understanding while lessening the anxiety many of the students feel when I ask them to act out a scene in class, and this shared process of creating meaning is everything I want my classes to be.

 

If you have any questions or ideas about this lesson in either of its forms, please email me at gcampbell@stalbansschool.org or reach out on Twitter (@21stCenturyLit).

 

Reading Part One, Part Two, Part Three and Part Four of our Teaching Twelfth Night with Technology series.

 

 

Gene Campbell is the Dean of Students and an English teacher in the Upper School of St. Albans School, an all-boys Episcopal school in Washington, DC. He received his BA in English from Georgetown University and his MA in English from The Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury College. He currently teaches British Literature to 10th graders as well as 11th and 12th grade electives ranging from Comparative Literature to 21st Century Literature to Narrative Film.

 

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By Jenna Gardner

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

 

This is an activity I used with students at the beginning of Twelfth Night Act 2, scene 2 when Viola, disguised as Cesario, realizes that Olivia loves her because Olivia believes Viola to be “the man” she pretends to be.

 

The beauty of Shakespeare is in its performance, which allows students to hear and see his words and engage with all the possible meanings of a text. I wanted to help my students visualize Shakespeare’s language and to promote hypothesizing, discussion, debate, and critical reasoning regarding his implicit as well as explicit meanings in Twelfth Night. The online tool Voyant allows an entire text to be investigated by simply embedding a corpus copied and pasted from a website. Using Voyant and Folger Digital Texts, students can see the words of greatest frequency in a word cloud and perform keyword searches to see word frequency and area of occurrence in the text. Data in all the fields— word cloud, word trends, and keywords in context, etc.—can be exported and saved.

 

THE VIDEO

 

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

 

By using Voyant, my students engaged in a close reading of Viola’s soliloquy, “I left no ring with her…”, and through this tool my students began to see the role that disguise had already begun to play in Twelfth Night. Students had activating questions that they worked on in preparation for our in-class work and discussion. By manipulating and analyzing the text in Voyant, students tested questions, made observations, and drew conclusions about the force and impact of disguise in the rest of the play.

 

As a class we discussed Shakespeare’s use of disguise, and students began to generate other associated words—hide, deceive secret, deception, etc. Working in groups with laptops they tried out their brainstorming words and generated new terms they felt that were related to this idea of disguise. This could also be done with projecting the screen of one computer and having the class work collectively. Using Voyant’s tools to look at instances where these terms occurred in the play allowed them to see the rhythm of disguise within Shakespeare’s work and to be mindful of their occurrence when they emerged in later class readings. This activity works especially well when paired with student performance work. The whole idea of disguise really comes to life not just when students use Voyant to analyze it but when they speak and embody it.

 

This close reading focus on disguise also led to an in-depth discussion on the role of dramatic irony in comedy and why it is so essential. This was a text I taught at the beginning of the school year to develop my AP English Literature students’ close reading skills. All of their work led to writing an analytical essay on their close reading of this soliloquy.

 

Voyant can be used with any text that students find intimidating. It is a tool I used with our class study of Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights in which we examined her use of hellish and heavenly terms—angel, devil, fiend—and their importance in conveying her thematic inversion of meaning.

 

Please feel free to send me your questions or ideas by contacting me on Twitter! (@JennaGLit)

 

Read Part One, Part Two, and Part Three of our Teaching Twelfth Night with Technology series.

 

Jenna Gardner is an AP English Literature, Junior Language Arts, and AP Art History teacher at Meadowcreek High School in Norcross, Georgia. Currently her students are in the midst of their Shakespeare Madness debates, which are calling on them to use their close reading skills to argue for Shakespeare’s ‘best’ play.

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By Rachel Jean-Marie

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

 

In this video, you will see a demonstration that provides ideas on how to engage students in a close reading of the text by exploring Shakespeare’s use of language in a specific scene in Twelfth Night using hypertext annotations.  Obviously, it’s good if students have had lessons/practice with figurative language (similes, metaphors, personification, puns, allusions, etc.)  After the video, feel free to check out ways to take this video to the next level by leading students through a process that encourages them to use a variety of tools to research the language, use hyperlinks, physicalize the text, and engage in a reflective debrief.

To take this lesson to the next level:

  1. Have students work together in small groups using a variety of resources to research the text as they read, annotate, and discuss the scene using useful tools such as dictionaries, their cell phones, the online lexicon, each other, and so on.
    (Tip: Keep the scene short by providing half a scene if necessary for longer scenes.)
  2.  Have students use the strategies shared in this video to “annotate” the text using hyperlinks, and provide students with some time to bring the scene alive through a physical interpretation of this scene.  By this point, the students should be pretty familiar with this scene.
  3. Finally, allow students to debrief the process.  After the video, check out some of my sample questions below.

 

THE VIDEO:

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

 

This video does not demonstrate how to actually use Tagxedo.  If you can’t figure it out yourself, it’s okay!  Just ask a colleague or engage one of your shy tech savvy students to “tutor” you on it.  Nevertheless, if you have each group add their words to the Tagxedo Creator, they could create a visual representation of the terms that they chose to focus on during their “research” of the text.  If printed out, this image could be used on screen or on an overhead projector as the introductory image to their scene.
Sample Debrief Questions:

  1. What is the difference between active and passive reading? Benefits?
  2. What are your thoughts about exploring the text together?
  3. What are you thoughts about using resources like cell phones, lexicons (book & online versions), dictionaries, and laptops to explore the text?
  4. How do all of this (annotating, working with others, using resources, physicalizing the text, etc.) help with comprehension?

 

  • The students came up with wonderful responses.  Here are some of their thoughts:
  • Working together enabled us to explore different interpretations.
  • We got a chance to develop different skills by collaborating at some points and working independently at other points.
  • Needed it to understand the words
  • Makes piece stronger
  • Can’t act something you don’t know
  • Helps with interpretation and comprehension
  • Shakespeare uses everyday language differently and we are always changing as well as our understanding of words
  • Understanding Shakespeare’s context/meaning and our own interpretation/meaning

 

Students had a lot of fun with this activity.

Read Part One and Part Two of our Teaching Twelfth Night with Technology series.

 

Rachel Jean-Marie has been working at Boston Day & Evening Academy for the past 11 years as a Humanities teacher. BDEA is a competency-based alternative high school in the Roxbury area of Boston, MA that serves 16 to 22 year olds who haven’t been successful in a traditional school setting and were at risk of dropping out.

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By Matt Seymour

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

 

This video gives a full activity plan that teachers can use to help students learn multiple skills at once. They learn vocabulary, how to use Google Docs, and how to access and search the Folger Digital Texts. An added bonus is that it unites the class on one, big, language-based project.

 

THE VIDEO

 

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

 

This lesson has been a great vehicle for getting students to do a good second reading of the text. It shows them that after we learn a few of the more difficult words, a scene becomes even more accessible and comprehensible. This has also worked well as an introduction to using Google Docs for group work. With this tool, students have a way to collaborate on a project, even from home. It is particularly useful for when we cut lines from a scene for performances because everyone will have access to the same script.

 

Read Part One of our Teaching Twelfth Night with Technology series.

 

Matt Seymour teaches English composition and literature at Colorado Early Colleges Fort Collins. He holds a Bachelor’s in philosophy and a Master’s in English Ed. He has been teaching for 8 years.

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By Folger Education

 

Here’s another great teaching video on Act 1 of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, this time from Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher Alli Gubanich.

 

Here’s Alli’s message for you as you watch her iMovie tutorial on using technology and movement to teach language and imagery:

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

 

This video provides a brief overview of a favorite classroom activity (tableaux vivants) and a favorite classroom tool (iMovie).  I use iMovie in many lessons and find it intuitive and user friendly.  If your students don’t have access to Apple products, Microsoft video production software would work, as would YouTube’s own video maker.  Tableaux vivants compel students to think deeply about the essence of a text, look for powerful imagery, and create meaningful “pictures” to demonstrate their understanding and take-away.

 

THE VIDEO: Tableaux Vivants with iMovie

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

 

Students have a lot of fun with this activity.  Sometimes I’ve found it helpful to run two separate tableaux vivant activities: first students create plot-driven tableaux, then they create “deep text” or theme-driven tableaux.  Differentiating the two is important, as students will often fall back on the former, missing out on the higher level thinking required of the latter.  I always start with a word study of the term “tableaux vivants” and do some quick practice with simple sentences.  I’ve also assigned single frame artwork as an extension to this activity, which has worked nicely.  Debriefing in discussion and/or in writing also enriches the lesson.

Feel free to let me know how this activity goes for you! I’m on Twitter: @alligub.

Read Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part One

Alli Gubanich is an upper school English teacher at AIM Academy, a research-to-practice lab school in Conshohocken, PA that serves students with learning differences.  Her professional interests include technology infusion in the classroom and differentiated learning in the 21st century classroom.  Additionally, Alli is an accredited teacher trainer in the Socratic Seminar instructional method.

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By Folger Education

In July 2014, 25 teachers from all over the country gathered at the Folger for an intensive month-long study of Shakespeare sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities: the Teaching Shakespeare Institute. Working through the lenses of scholarship, performance, and pedagogy, participants completed three major projects: 1) a research paper using items in the Folger collection, 2) a collaborative performance presentation, and 3) two short video tutorials on technology-rich strategies for teaching Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth Night. This last one is directed especially at you, our teaching colleagues.

In the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing participants’ videos with you. These clips demonstrate how to use a particular tech tool to teach a specific literacy skill or aspect of a text. First up: Romeo and Juliet. (If you teach Twelfth Night, stay tuned—those videos will be next!)

Today we’re diving into Act 1 of Romeo and Juliet, and we’re lucky to have English teacher Stefanie Jochman as our guide. She’s going to walk you through what to watch for in her videos—and how she’s adapted the strategy this year in class.

BEFORE YOU WATCH

This video lesson explains how teachers can use Mozilla Popcorn Maker, a web-based video-editing program, to explore Act I, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, specifically the “Holy Palmer” sonnet. My Popcorn Maker video seeks to solve a problem teachers sometimes encounter when conducting multimedia studies: lag-time between loading video clips or showing images. Using Popcorn Maker, I knit film clips, ballet excerpts, and digital images from the Folger Library’s Luna database into one fluid video that also displays focus questions for each medium. Compilations like the one I create in this demonstration help students to analyze the representation of a key scene in a variety of artistic media (Common Core Reading Literature Standard 7) or analyze how artists like Sondheim or Zeffirelli draw on source material from Shakespeare (Common Core Reading Literature Standard 9).

THE VIDEO: Popcorn Maker Tutorial

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MqkIzLQ3Yg&feature=youtu.be

THE BONUS VIDEO: The Finished Product, a Popcorn Version of the “Holy Palmer” Sonnet

https://msjochman.makes.org/popcorn/261o

AFTER YOU WATCH

The Romeo and Juliet multimedia study remains one of my favorite lessons in my Romeo and Juliet unit because students’ responses to the discussion questions are so impressive. Some of my students have never watched ballet before this lesson, but their knowledge of Romeo and Juliet the play, one seemingly-difficult medium, helps them to make sense of another. During this lesson, students recognize and hone the analytical skills they already employ whenever they go to the movies, watch TV, or glance at a piece of art on the street, in their houses, or in a gallery. When asking freshmen to compare representations of Act 1, Scene 5, I try to focus on the scene’s essential elements: the language of the “Holy Palmer” sonnet, Romeo’s feeling of “love-at-first-sight,” Juliet’s youth, and the tension between the Montagues and Capulets (personified by Tybalt). I think students surprise themselves with how quickly they notice details in costuming and performance that communicate those elements.

My Romeo and Juliet multimedia study inspired a similar exploration with my IB junior class of Shylock’s “To bait fish withal” speech from The Merchant of Venice. I challenged those older, advanced students to determine the scene’s “essential elements,” and I let their observations (rather than my own pop-up questions) guide discussions of the clips. Actors’ interpretations of Shylock’s speech vary so wildly that the end result of our study was a greater appreciation for the nuance of Shakespeare’s language. I also shared Popcorn Maker and other video tools with some of my senior IB students, and they used the program to demonstrate how the Byronic hero survives in superhero movies.

In the future, I hope to develop a compilation and analysis assignment that requires students to independently assemble and analyze multiple representations of a scene, poem, chapter, or character.

Feel free to send me your questions or ideas on Twitter (@MsJochman).

Stefanie Jochman teaches 9th grade and International Baccalaureate English classes at Notre Dame de la Baie Academy in Green Bay, WI. She received her BA in English and Secondary Education from St. Norbert College and her MA in English from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Stefanie is a proud alumna of the 2014 Teaching Shakespeare Institute. 

 

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By Corinne Viglietta

It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across all of Shakespeare’s works? Would you like to see a picture of Titus Andronicus pie?

Check out these free, fun-to-explore web tools that bring you and your students into the world of the Folger—and Shakespeare’s words.

  1. Pinterest –Folger has over 45 boards: 1 for each play, plus others on the sonnets, Shakespeare and love, and images of Shakespeare.
  2. Podcasts – Listen to free poetry readings, interviews, and powerhouse lectures on data-mining Shakespeare and Shakespeare in American life. Use clips in your classroom, and don’t forget to click on “More Folger Podcasts”!
  3. Folger Digital Texts – The Folger editions you know and love are now online, for free (minus the glosses you’re used to seeing on the left-hand pages of your paperbacks). They’re made for you and your students to read, search, cut, paste, and manipulate for classroom activities like editing exercises, performances, and research tasks.
  4. Luna Digital Image Collection – Students can create their own “media groups” for particular plays, poems, or essential questions. Or try writing a document-based question that focuses on one item from the Folger, home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare and to major collections of books, manuscripts, and works of art!

    Luna image

    Screenshot of a Luna user’s media group on Twelfth Night

Once you’ve tried out these resources, let us know how you and your students are using them!

 

Corinne Viglietta is Assistant Director of Education at the Folger. She has taught English in DC, Maryland, and France.

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