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Archive for the ‘Technology in the Classroom’ Category

By Corinne Viglietta

It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across all of Shakespeare’s works? Would you like to see a picture of Titus Andronicus pie?

Check out these free, fun-to-explore web tools that bring you and your students into the world of the Folger—and Shakespeare’s words.

  1. Pinterest –Folger has over 45 boards: 1 for each play, plus others on the sonnets, Shakespeare and love, and images of Shakespeare.
  2. Podcasts – Listen to free poetry readings, interviews, and powerhouse lectures on data-mining Shakespeare and Shakespeare in American life. Use clips in your classroom, and don’t forget to click on “More Folger Podcasts”!
  3. Folger Digital Texts – The Folger editions you know and love are now online, for free (minus the glosses you’re used to seeing on the left-hand pages of your paperbacks). They’re made for you and your students to read, search, cut, paste, and manipulate for classroom activities like editing exercises, performances, and research tasks.
  4. Luna Digital Image Collection – Students can create their own “media groups” for particular plays, poems, or essential questions. Or try writing a document-based question that focuses on one item from the Folger, home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare and to major collections of books, manuscripts, and works of art!

    Luna image

    Screenshot of a Luna user’s media group on Twelfth Night

Once you’ve tried out these resources, let us know how you and your students are using them!

 

Corinne Viglietta is Assistant Director of Education at the Folger. She has taught English in DC, Maryland, and France.

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By Corinne Viglietta

HSFP students

Our competitive antedaters use new web tools to find the true origins of words attributed to Shakespeare.

We just wrapped up our (exhilarating!) 2014 High School Fellowship, dubbed affectionately by its 16 participants as “Varsity Shakespeare.”

Since September, local high schoolers gathered here every Monday to take on big questions and deep learning around Shakespeare and the humanities.

They saw productions of King Lear and Julius Caesar and performed their own cutting of Twelfth Night. And they conducted original research in the Folger collection. It was a blast, and they were fabulous!

As first-time head teacher of the Fellowship (I was teaching 8th and 9th grade English here in DC until recently), I wanted to pause and share what I learned—and how it might connect to any classroom. (more…)

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By Dana Huff

Act IV, Scene 1 of Macbeth is great fun: the three witches are brewing a “hell-broth” which they will use to conjure the apparitions that talk to Macbeth.

The scene contains some of the most memorable lines of the play and lends itself well to choral reading activities. When I teach this scene, my students create a radio play using podcasting software.

Shakespeare Set Free – Volume 1: Teaching A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth shares a fun lesson plan for teaching this scene, assigning speaking parts and sound effects to students. Podcasting software adds dimensions to this lesson that were not possible when Shakespeare Set Free was originally published.

Chris Shamburg presented a method for using podcasting software and Foley art to create sound effects as part of the Folger’s series of presentations at an NCTE conference in San Antonio in 2008.

Chris brought volunteers up to play the roles of readers and Foley artists. One volunteer broke potato chips in a bowl to mimic the sound of crunching leaves as the witches approached the cauldron, while another volunteer splashed water when the ingredients hit the cauldron.

Two popular options for recording podcasts are Audacity and GarageBand. With software such as Audacity, which is free and can be used on both Windows and Mac machines, students will first need to brainstorm ways to make sound effects. Some ideas include wind blowing, owls hooting, dogs barking, and liquid sloshing as the cauldron stirs.

(more…)

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By Dana Huff

In order to help students develop close reading skills, we teach them how to annotate.

Annotation has traditionally been thought of as a pencil-and-paper activity, but e-readers, such as Kindle and iBooks, have great annotation tools. However, website annotation has been more of a challenge for students since browsers don’t typically include the same kinds of annotation tools as e-readers do.

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With all the technology tools out there, how can you sort out which ones are the most useful for your classroom?

Dana Huff, the Humanities/Technology specialist for the 2014 Teaching Shakespeare Institute at the Folger, recently offered a valuable breakdown of some of the more popular tools.

As she highlights, the first thing to understand when integrating technology into the classroom is that we don’t want to use technology for the sake of using technology.

Huff instead uses the SAMR model to categorize a variety of tools:

dana_huff_smar_model

What’s been your own experience integrating technology into your classroom? What’s worked and what hasn’t? Let us know in the comments.

Check out the full post on HuffEnglish.com to read more of Huff’s analysis of specific tools like Scrible, Google Drive, and Popcorn Maker.

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canada

In a recent post, I requested that schools, theaters, or anyone else should stage a flash mob for the “balcony scene” from Romeo and Juliet, with a script created using Folger Digital Texts. Well, the deadline has passed, and we’ve had 28 fabulous submissions. They come from Punahou School in Hawaii; from the University of Northern Iowa; from Ottawa, Canada; from George, Kansas; and from Brooklyn, NY, among others. (more…)

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Find this quote in context at folgerdigitaltexts.org

Guest post by Josh Cabat

“Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.”

While the average ELA Chair or Director has little to fear in terms of civil unrest in the Northlands, we have all, as did Henry IV, struggled with internal resistance to change.

How often have you found a great idea at a conference or in a journal, and then presented it at a department meeting only to have it greeted with smiles and nods and subsequently ignored? Reflecting on and changing our own process is challenging enough; to get others to do so is often a steep mountain indeed.

This is even more true when it comes to Shakespeare. Resistance to new ideas in teaching Shakespeare usually comes in two flavors. One comes out as “You expect those students to do Shakespeare?” which usually signifies the teacher’s own insecurity with the material. The other is the complete opposite: “You’re telling me how to teach Shakespeare?” Take heart, though; there are many ways over, around, and through these walls. (more…)

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