Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Technology in the Classroom’ Category

By Folger Education

Today we bring you an idea for a final project in a Romeo and Juliet unit. Watch how Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher David Fulco blends performance, language study, and digital research in this student-centered assignment. We love how he uses web tools to promote exploratory, independent learning in his middle school classroom! 

Here’s David:

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

I am constantly trying to find ways to talk less in class and to have students do more. Ultimately, this should lead to more student independence and free up time for me to focus in small groups and in one-on-one conferencing. A webquest is the perfect tool to encourage this type of independence. Students are able to move at their own pace and have an answer to the inevitable question, “What do I do next?” (hint: continue to explore!). But webquests are also fun and provide a way for students to engage in the text in an interactive, exploratory fashion.

 

THE VIDEO

A Webquest as a Culminating Assignment:

 

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

While I did not teach Romeo and Juliet this year, I did use a Webquest to build content knowledge before teaching The Odyssey. My students have a basic idea of Greek Mythology, but I wanted to deliver content on the Iliad that didn’t require me to drone on and on in the front of the classroom. I built the Webquest and filled it with pictures, links and Easter Eggs (secret hidden links that the students could click on for extra information). We also asked the students to create their own “slides” to include in the Webquest based on items that I had not already included. Many focused on current events or current discoveries tied to Homer’s time allowing the work to continue to feel relevant.

While students were engaged in exploring and creating, my co-teacher and I were able to meet individually and in small groups with many of our students who needed extra help. I realized that some of the links that I chose were dense, so it was important that I had this time to work one-on-one with students who needed it. This is important to keep in mind. The links that are included need to be challenging for the highest student, but still accessible to every student in the class. Keeping ALL of your students in mind when creating a Webquest (or multiple Webquests for differentiation) is an important step to ensure that you will have success.

Feel free to send me your questions or ideas on Twitter (@FulcoTeaches).

 

Read Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Three

 

David Fulco is a 10th grade English teacher at The Laboratory School of Finance and Technology (MS/HS223) in the South Bronx. He also runs an after school Shakespeare club for seventh grade students who will be putting on A Midsummer Night’s Dream later this spring. 

Read Full Post »

By Folger Education

 

What does sound editing software have to do with Shakespeare? Let’s find out in the third installment of our teacher-created videos on teaching Romeo and Juliet.


Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum Matt Seymour shares a creative, accessible, and engaging approach to teaching iambic pentameter. See how Matt gets his students tinkering with a technology called Audacity—and with a metrical pattern that’s close to our hearts!


Over to Matt: 

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

Iambic pentameter never made sense to me in high school. I could tell you what it was, but I couldn’t recognize or hear it. This lesson is an effort to render the patterns of stress in speech visible, so students can make a connection to sound through sight.

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

This lesson was a good start for getting students to use an online audio program, and it helped communicate what can be a difficult concept for students to grasp. Students enjoyed this lesson because they got to play with a new program and they were able to hear themselves reading. This audio program can be great for teaching students to read more fluently and having them create podcasts. Students can also use this program for group projects where they add subtext and “act out” a scene with their voices and add sound effects.

Read Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part Two

Matt Seymour teaches English composition and literature at Colorado Early Colleges Fort Collins. He holds a Bachelor’s in philosophy and a Master’s in English. He has been teaching for 8 years.

Read Full Post »

By Folger Education

 

Here’s another great teaching video on Act 1 of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, this time from Teaching Shakespeare Institute 2014 alum and English teacher Alli Gubanich.

 

Here’s Alli’s message for you as you watch her iMovie tutorial on using technology and movement to teach language and imagery:

 

BEFORE YOU WATCH

 

This video provides a brief overview of a favorite classroom activity (tableaux vivants) and a favorite classroom tool (iMovie).  I use iMovie in many lessons and find it intuitive and user friendly.  If your students don’t have access to Apple products, Microsoft video production software would work, as would YouTube’s own video maker.  Tableaux vivants compel students to think deeply about the essence of a text, look for powerful imagery, and create meaningful “pictures” to demonstrate their understanding and take-away.

 

THE VIDEO: Tableaux Vivants with iMovie

 

AFTER YOU WATCH

 

Students have a lot of fun with this activity.  Sometimes I’ve found it helpful to run two separate tableaux vivant activities: first students create plot-driven tableaux, then they create “deep text” or theme-driven tableaux.  Differentiating the two is important, as students will often fall back on the former, missing out on the higher level thinking required of the latter.  I always start with a word study of the term “tableaux vivants” and do some quick practice with simple sentences.  I’ve also assigned single frame artwork as an extension to this activity, which has worked nicely.  Debriefing in discussion and/or in writing also enriches the lesson.

Feel free to let me know how this activity goes for you! I’m on Twitter: @alligub.

Read Teaching Romeo and Juliet with Technology: Part One

Alli Gubanich is an upper school English teacher at AIM Academy, a research-to-practice lab school in Conshohocken, PA that serves students with learning differences.  Her professional interests include technology infusion in the classroom and differentiated learning in the 21st century classroom.  Additionally, Alli is an accredited teacher trainer in the Socratic Seminar instructional method.

Read Full Post »

By Corinne Viglietta

It’s Tech Tuesday, everyone! Looking for a digital image of Paul Robeson’s promptbook for Othello?  Ever wonder what a Pinterest board for The Tempest would look like? Do you want to trace the uses of the word “fair” across all of Shakespeare’s works? Would you like to see a picture of Titus Andronicus pie?

Check out these free, fun-to-explore web tools that bring you and your students into the world of the Folger—and Shakespeare’s words.

  1. Pinterest –Folger has over 45 boards: 1 for each play, plus others on the sonnets, Shakespeare and love, and images of Shakespeare.
  2. Podcasts – Listen to free poetry readings, interviews, and powerhouse lectures on data-mining Shakespeare and Shakespeare in American life. Use clips in your classroom, and don’t forget to click on “More Folger Podcasts”!
  3. Folger Digital Texts – The Folger editions you know and love are now online, for free (minus the glosses you’re used to seeing on the left-hand pages of your paperbacks). They’re made for you and your students to read, search, cut, paste, and manipulate for classroom activities like editing exercises, performances, and research tasks.
  4. Luna Digital Image Collection – Students can create their own “media groups” for particular plays, poems, or essential questions. Or try writing a document-based question that focuses on one item from the Folger, home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare and to major collections of books, manuscripts, and works of art!

    Luna image

    Screenshot of a Luna user’s media group on Twelfth Night

Once you’ve tried out these resources, let us know how you and your students are using them!

 

Corinne Viglietta is Assistant Director of Education at the Folger. She has taught English in DC, Maryland, and France.

Read Full Post »

By Corinne Viglietta

HSFP students

Our competitive antedaters use new web tools to find the true origins of words attributed to Shakespeare.

We just wrapped up our (exhilarating!) 2014 High School Fellowship, dubbed affectionately by its 16 participants as “Varsity Shakespeare.”

Since September, local high schoolers gathered here every Monday to take on big questions and deep learning around Shakespeare and the humanities.

They saw productions of King Lear and Julius Caesar and performed their own cutting of Twelfth Night. And they conducted original research in the Folger collection. It was a blast, and they were fabulous!

As first-time head teacher of the Fellowship (I was teaching 8th and 9th grade English here in DC until recently), I wanted to pause and share what I learned—and how it might connect to any classroom. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Dana Huff

Act IV, Scene 1 of Macbeth is great fun: the three witches are brewing a “hell-broth” which they will use to conjure the apparitions that talk to Macbeth.

The scene contains some of the most memorable lines of the play and lends itself well to choral reading activities. When I teach this scene, my students create a radio play using podcasting software.

Shakespeare Set Free – Volume 1: Teaching A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth shares a fun lesson plan for teaching this scene, assigning speaking parts and sound effects to students. Podcasting software adds dimensions to this lesson that were not possible when Shakespeare Set Free was originally published.

Chris Shamburg presented a method for using podcasting software and Foley art to create sound effects as part of the Folger’s series of presentations at an NCTE conference in San Antonio in 2008.

Chris brought volunteers up to play the roles of readers and Foley artists. One volunteer broke potato chips in a bowl to mimic the sound of crunching leaves as the witches approached the cauldron, while another volunteer splashed water when the ingredients hit the cauldron.

Two popular options for recording podcasts are Audacity and GarageBand. With software such as Audacity, which is free and can be used on both Windows and Mac machines, students will first need to brainstorm ways to make sound effects. Some ideas include wind blowing, owls hooting, dogs barking, and liquid sloshing as the cauldron stirs.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Dana Huff

In order to help students develop close reading skills, we teach them how to annotate.

Annotation has traditionally been thought of as a pencil-and-paper activity, but e-readers, such as Kindle and iBooks, have great annotation tools. However, website annotation has been more of a challenge for students since browsers don’t typically include the same kinds of annotation tools as e-readers do.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 879 other followers