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Posts Tagged ‘Peggy O’Brien’

Scott Van Wye, a student of Richard Phillipy at Lawrence Central High School in Indianapolis, won first prize at the 31st annual English-Speaking Union National Shakespeare Competition on May 5. Scott performed a speech by Benedick from Much Ado About Nothing and a cold reading from The Tempest in addition to a sonnet. The competition was held at Lincoln Center Theater in New York City for 58 winners of ESU Branch competitions nationwide. Scott’s prize for placing first is a full scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art’s Young Actors Summer School in London. (more…)

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Yeats is the guy who said that education is not the filling of a pail but the lighting of a fire.  What I think about all the time is how that fire gets lit.  What’s the spark that turned you on to Shakespeare?  Who or what lit that fire or that fuse for you?

Why am I thinking about the fire and from whence it comes?  Since the beginning of March—a scant six weeks ago—here’s what’s been visible at this lively shoebox of a library: (more…)

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Last December, we led a Master Class on teaching Romeo and Juliet, streamed live from the public television studio we have tucked inside our building.  Six hundred of you joined us, asked questions and made comments on the air, and lit up the chat box during the hour.  A whole bunch of you were kind enough to participate in the survey that we sent you the following day.  In the course of your feedback, several of you suggested that the Folger hold office hours on a regular basis  . . . and on Twitter.

We loved the office hours idea!  For the last few months, we’ve done that–but for sure we don’t have the hang of it yet.  So we’re asking you to help us get this right. . . because that’s how we roll here.  We don’t ever plan anything without input and advice from teachers.

First, a reality check:  office hours for an hour or two on a monthly basis . . . overall a good idea?  If it is, then I’m gonna keep on asking:

  • What time of day, and which day, is best for you?
  • Is Twitter the best medium?  Our notion was to give quick answers and then follow up with  more detailed info in a blog entry that’s posted the following week.  Does that make sense to you?
  • What would make you want to show up at office hours?
  • Should office hours be on topics of your choosing, or should that be on us?  “January’s office hours: Teaching Macbeth
  • Should we schedule topics way in advance?
  • What other good ideas should we be having about this that we’re not?

Answer in the comments section and straighten us out.  Thanks.  Help.

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Until earlier this fall, I was clearly the one in love with words, literature, classrooms, teachers’ lounges, theatre.  Math and science not so much.  OK, so my grade in Biology as a college freshman was D.  Not so interested in photosynthesis. Still not the least bit interested in photosynthesis, but now I am crazily interested in archaeology and genetics.  I still am in love with words, literature, theatre, and classrooms.

But my world has gotten a lot wider and more wonderful.  And I have been brought to this place by the divinely cramped up and misshapen corpse of that devilish king, Richard III.

In August 2012, the University of Leicester (in central England) began one of the most ambitious archaeological projects ever attempted:  a search for the lost grave of Richard III, the last English king to die in battle.

Image Credit: University of Leicester

Image Credit: University of Leicester

Here at the Folger, we have just had the great honor and huge pleasure of hosting Dr. Turi King and Dr. Mathew Morris, the geneticist and archaeologist who respectively made the DNA match and led the dig.

Their story is thrilling—intense, historical, modern, gut hunches, scientific data. It’s also a story about smart people doing smart, smart work against the odds. Turi says that at the beginning, it was a little like a missing person’s story: King Richard is missing and we’re putting together all that is known now, so we can go off to find him. She also says that, at the outset, they felt their chances of finding him were past slim. (more…)

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Lots of buzz around the Folger these days because Janet Griffin, Artistic Producer of the Folger Theatre, and Robert Richmond, director of our upcoming production of Richard III, are taking a walk on the wild side.

You know about the theatre here, right?  Background in case you don’t:  Folks here sometimes call the Folger Theatre “an evocation of an Elizabethan theatre”… not a model of any one in particular but with features like galleries and an inner above that make you think of the Globe.

It’s a sweet little 250-seat theatre tucked right inside the Library building.  Janet and her team produce three or four award-winning plays a year, and if you haven’t seen a play here, put us on your New Year’s resolution list right this minute.

So how do we get from an Elizabethan theatre to the wild side? (more…)

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The Folger Shakespeare Library is a hotbed of education staff, scholars, actors, directors, curators, librarians, docents, and digital geeks in Washington, DC, teamed up with teachers all over the country – in an endless collaboration focused on your teaching and your students’ learning.

What do we believe about teaching and learning? Read on:

1. We believe that teachers are the most important and the most powerful people on earth. Period.

2. All students should have access to Shakespeare’s rigorous texts and compelling ideas. Students at all levels of proficiency can and should engage deeply with these plays.

3. You and all of your students can dive into, engage with, and make sense of these complex texts with great success. This work will enhance your students’ close reading and analytical skills. Yours, too. And all of you will have an enormous amount of fun in the process!

4. It’s all about the language. Approach, connect with, and befriend Shakespeare’s language head on. Your students’ direct connection with his language is the key to unlocking the plays – and everything in them. We don’t mean you, as teacher, translating for them. And we don’t mean using those “made easy” books. We mean THEM speaking and moving and figuring out HIM… words, lines, scenes, plays. His language in the mouths of your students is splendid and exciting all on its own. And it is the essential step that results in sending his ideas into their brains.

5. So… if you are teaching Shakespeare the way you were taught, you might need to give that up. If you are teaching Shakespeare from those dumbed-down versions of the plays created by publishers who believe that both you and your students are not smart enough to understand the real thing, throw them out. Right now.

6. The Folger continues to produce – with and for teachers – ever-evolving sets of language tools, active close reading strategies, performance techniques, and pathways through the plays that are energizing and fun, and that relentlessly focus on text. In DC and all over the place, we teach teachers how to do this work. A poorly kept secret: teachers use these tools and strategies to teach all kinds of literature, and subjects way beyond English.

7. Using these tools and strategies, you and your students work in the plays rigorously and vigorously in the way that scholars and actors do. Your students make their way actively – reading closely, thinking deeply, and citing textual evidence all over the place. They build their skills and their knowledge. And you do too. Research has shown us that learning this way dramatically increases students’ confidence – in their ability to tackle something hard, to figure it out, to “own” this playwright and his plays – and boosts their enthusiasm for learning the next hard thing: August Wilson, reconstruction, Lear, calculus, Arabic.

8. Any teacher can teach this way. You don’t have to know anything about acting or directing or any of that stuff. In fact, it’s better if you don’t. He knew how to write. You know how to teach. And if you’re worried about this last part, we can help you with that.

Peggy O’Brien is the Director of Education at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Follow her on Twitter at @obrienfolger or send her an email at pobrien@folger.edu.

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In the rush of the holiday season, our director of education, Peggy O’Brien, pauses to offer these reflections, looking back at NCTE 2013 and ahead to a bright future!

On the Folger’s presence at NCTE…

  • What a thrill to be in the midst of so many English teachers!  What possibly could be better? It’s so good to be home.
  • We always want what we bring to NCTE—our sessions, offerings at the booth, materials—to be as useful to teachers as they can possibly be. People packed the sessions, many have followed up on email for more info… yes!
  • Next year, NCTE is in DC! Or, more accurately, just outside of DC. We’ll present at the conference, but we also want LOADS of teachers to come to the Folger… see a play, hang out with some rare books and manuscripts, participate in hands-on, active workshops in the Folger Theatre, and more.
  • Lots of folks interested in the Folger appsOthello, Romeo, and Macbeth.  The techie way to plunge students (and teachers) right into the play. Hamlet and the Dream out before the end of 2013. Add these to the formats the Folger already offers: wonderfully edited plays available in paperback books (as they have been for ages) and free online versions in the Folger Digital Texts (www.folgerdigitaltexts.org). Love it!
  • So happy to be distributing our new Folger Philosophy of Teaching and Learning. The philosophy’s not new, but the articulation is. It’s good to have our foundation in print.

On next week’s master class…

  • Gearing up for our Master Class on Dec. 11: Our “teacher on the street” videography team—Lauren Chavey and Beth O’Brien—asking teachers at NCTE about their greatest successes and challenges teaching R+J. Got such compelling, splendid answers.  Teaser:  With a particularly tough ninth grade class, using Marvin Gaye to get everybody into the play. Big success story!

On great teachers and educators…

  • Such a treat and a relief to be among folks who are talking passionately about good teaching, rather than the politics of the Common Core. Obviously, policy is important, but… great teaching is what really makes it all happen.
  • Met Jim Burke, whom I have described many times as in “the Mount Rushmore of English teachers.” He’s great and so are his new books on the Common Core—they are just based on solid, excellent teaching.  Perfect.
  • Big shout out to Eileen Landay and the Arts Literacy Project that she founded at Brown University… and her mention of the evidence provided by neuroscience that points to the difference between reading vs. reading and doing.

On the Folger’s Romeo and Juliet flash mob…

  • THE FOLGER FLASH MOBFABULOUS!  150+ people in the cold, in the dark, in the plaza next to the Convention Center—Boston at 6pm on a Saturday night—all having the time of their lives doing the balcony scene. Now for our big question: What collaborative, public Shakespeare do we do at NCTE next year?

Peggy O’Brien is the Director of Education at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Follow her on Twitter at @obrienfolger or send her an email at pobrien@folger.edu.

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